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Blackpill [Study] African American and Caucasian males' evaluation of radicalized female facial averages

InMemoriam

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Watson, Rhea M., "African American and Caucasian males' evaluation of racialized female facial averages" (2010). UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones. 366. http://dx.doi.org/10.34917/1606667
the study was done by a foid, dont ask!

ABSTRACT
The current study investigated African American and Caucasian males’ evaluation (attraction) to racialized female faces. Faces varied from 100% African American to 100% Caucasian (and included variations that were 25% of either group, or 50% of both groups). Twenty African American and 30 Caucasian men each viewed ten faces, and evaluated them in terms of their appearance and the likelihood that the men would interact with (befriend, date, or marry) the person pictured. Findings revealed that African American men found the 100% African American face attractive (and more positive in other respects), with decreasing evaluations for the 75%, 50% and 25% African American faces. African American men evaluated the 100% Caucasian face more positively than the mixed race faces. White men, in contrast, viewed the 100% African American face as least attractive (and least favorable in other respects), and the Caucasian face most attractive (and favorable). Findings were discussed in terms of the significance for stereotyping, attractiveness, race relations, and future research.

Present Research
"the current research explored if an averaged face containing all African American female faces was considered attractive by African American and Caucasian men. The research included averaged faces which were all African American, mixed with both African American and Caucasian faces, as well as composites which were all of Caucasian faces. In addition, the study focused on a vast number of attractiveness and social characteristics and traits that one may have found important when defining facial attractiveness. The specific attractiveness questions had the raters evaluate the skin tone, youthful appearance, femininity, familiarity, and symmetry of the face."

"In order to further validate previous research, the current proposal also investigated these constructs. It was postulated that since this was the first study that included raters and composites, both of African American heritage, it was important to collect the attractiveness information. Additionally, due to the exploratory nature of this research, social and personality qualities were measured as well. It was necessary to have raters judge the social and personality attributes of the composite because it has been well documented that negative stereotypes and stigmas have plagued Black women for generations; if the African American female facial composite was considered attractive the negative references may have been reduced"
:feelskek::feelskek::feelskek:

"Also, since media influences have sensationalized and objectified African American women as video vixens, caretakers, and needy single mothers, it was important that social constructs be investigated in order to help solidify if the influx of negative social images were a factor in the mate/date ascriptions of African American women to African American and Caucasian men "

well if it isn't the consequences of their own actions:feelsLSD::feelsLSD:

"More specifically, the halo effect, also considered as the beauty is good stereotype, and/or the attractiveness bias, may have influenced the men’s decision with the African American female morph. The halo effect contends that if the attractiveness level of an individual was low, negative social characteristics may be assigned to the individual as well"
Well, what do you know!:feelsjuice:


Hypotheses
Hypothesis 1: It was expected that the Biethnic composite was very identifiable with the African American males’ prototypical face and therefore rated as the most attractive face by African American men (Apicella, Little, & Marlowe, 2007; de Haan, Johnson, & Maurer, 2001; Langlois & Roggman, 1990; Potter & Corneille, 2008; Valentine, 1991; Valentine & Ferrara, 1991; Valentine et al., 2004). It was assumed that African American males had viewed hundreds of African American and Caucasian faces over their lifespan. Therefore, it was predicted that the 75% African American and 25% Caucasian photo would best fit within their face representation, making it easy to process the face cognitively and causing it to appear highly attractive.​
Hypothesis 2: In contrast, it was hypothesized that Caucasian males would consider the 100% Caucasian female composite as the most attractive face. It was theorized that the men may have had minimal experiences with African American females which would result in lower attractiveness rating for the majority African American facial composites. However, since they have had a healthy amount of exposure to Caucasian female faces, inherently, it was 27 expected that they had produced a prototype which in turn would generate high attractiveness rating for the Caucasian facial composite (Apicella et al., 2007; Potter & Corneille, 2008).
Hypothesis 3: It was hypothesized that greater ethnic identification would be associated with more favorable ratings for same ethnic group faces with the African American participants. More specifically, it was proposed that the levels of acculturation or racial/ethnic identification would be a strong predictor concerning their ratings of attractiveness of the African American composite. This hypothesis had little support in the literature; however, comparative studies involving skin tone, self esteem, academic achievement, physical and mental health, and marital/dating status had shown to be more positive when persons were highly committed to their ethnic identification (Anglin & Wade, 2009; Arroyo & Zigler, 1995; Crivens, 2000; Harvey et al., 2005; Klonoff & Landrine, 1999; Klonoff & Landrine, 2006; Resnicow et al., 2009; Speight et al., 1996; Townes et al., 2009; Webb, 2008; Williams, 2004). Moreover, research has supported that when one’s ethnic identity is a direct reflection of their cultural group (i.e. committed to the rituals and traditions), they are more inclined to associate with the elements surrounding their ethnicity.Past research has shown a number of variables correlated with attractiveness, including youthful, symmetrical, familiar, and feminine (all facial characteristics consistent with the attraction and averageness literature, see Alley & Cunningham, 1991; Langlois & Roggman, 1990; Langlois et al. 1994; Rhodes et al., 1999; Valentine et al., 2004). With the newer measure of skin 28 tone being introduced, the ethnic affiliation of the participant may be important in relation to the composites skin tone. If the African American participants believe that Black is beautiful, African American female photos may be rated as darker and attractive in order to stay congruent with their ethnic identity. However, she also could be judged as a darker skin tone and rated as unattractive if the participants’ ethnic affiliation is low. Although these two considerations appear to be the same, it was postulated that the composites with darker skin tones would be rated as attractive by those who are highly associated with their ethnic group. Opposing attraction ratings were expected for participants who were not affiliated with their ingroup.
Hypothesis 4: For the Caucasian participants, it was expected that if scores on the RISSA indicated that they are well accepting of multicultural appearances, they would be more attracted to darker skin tones. However, if their scores reflect a familiarity to European standards, it was posited that their skin tone and attraction ratings would echo a preference for their same ethnicity.

METHODOLOGY
Participants: Twenty African American and 30 Caucasian males participated in the study. The mean ages (and standard deviations) for the men were 24.26 (8.88) and 22.58 (9.09), for the African American and Caucasian men, respectively. Research participants were recruited through the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Psychology department database as well as through university organizations i.e. the Black Student Association, the Student Government Association, the Black Graduate Student Association, the Graduate and Professional Student Association, and Historically Black and White fraternal groups. Also, recruiting occurred through local community organizations such as churches, 100 Black Men of America, 100 Black Committed Men, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Urban League, and the Urban and Las Vegas Chambers of Commerce. Six African American participants were recruited from the community (although two were also members of the University’s student body) and four Caucasian men were recruits from outside of the University. The researcher contacted the leadership of some of the above mentioned groups and requested 5 minutes to present the research opportunity to its Board of Directors and/or membership body. Individuals had the choice of providing their contact information so that they could be scheduled for an appointment and/or 30 sign up for the experiment via the Psychology department participant base if they were enrolled in Psychology classes at UNLV.​

fast forwarding to the ''findings'':feelsthink:
RESULTS
Facial Evaluations
Overall, darkness ratings decreased from the 100% African American to the 25% African American face, and were lowest for the 100% Caucasian face .Caucasian participants rated the photos are darker than did African American participants, . Interestingly, the pictures were continuously rated as lighter by African American men than by Caucasian men until their judgments of the 100% Caucasian face, where the ratings nearly converged (see Figure 1). As shown, there was some agreement between the two groups on the skin color of the 100% Caucasian composite. Despite this converging pattern, the interaction between ethnicity of judges and ethnicity of picture narrowly missed significance,
Fig1 403
It was hypothesized that African American males would find the 75% African American female face as the most attractive face, and that Caucasian males would find the 100% Caucasian female face the most attractive. Examining the mean ratings of attractiveness, as shown in Figure 2, African American men did not find the 75% African American face as most attractive but rather rated both the 75% and the 100% African American composites almost equally . As predicted in hypothesis two, Caucasian men did rate the 100% Caucasian female face as the most attractive face. Additionally, they rated the 100% African American female face as the least attractive face. Moreover, Caucasian and African American men rated the Caucasian female face as attractive, Caucasian and African American males’ mean scores respectively).​
Figure 2 shows the mean ratings of attractiveness of the faces, separately for African American and Caucasian raters. To determine which differences between means accounted for the 43 significant interaction, comparisons of the means were made taking into account the 95% confidence intervals around the means, as shown in Table 1. Considering African American raters first, from these values it appears that African American raters judged the 100%, 75%, 50%, and 0% African American faces as equally attractive, with only the 25% African American faces judged low in attractiveness. In contrast, Caucasian raters judged the 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% African American faces as relatively low in attractiveness, with no differences, but judged the 0% African American (that is, 100% Caucasian) faces as attractive. In fact, the attractiveness ratings for the 0% African American faces on the part of both groups, 2.89 and 3.11 respectively for African American and Caucasian raters, both fell within the each other’s 95% confidence limits (and likewise, both rater groups judged the 25% African American faces as equally low in attractiveness, with mean ratings of 2.53 and 2.50).
Fig2 404
shown in Figure 3. There was a tendency for familiarity ratings by African American raters to decline as the photos declined in the percentage of African American features in the photos, and conversely a tendency for Caucasians’ ratings of familiarity to increase as the percentage of Caucasian features increased, thus accounting for the interaction. In agreement with this interpretation, the mean rating by Caucasian raters at the 75% Caucasian level (25% African American), 2.76, and at the 100% Caucasian level (0% African American), 2.72, fell outside the 95% confidence limits for the ratings by African American raters (upper bounds were 2.58 and 2.70, respectively).
Fig3 405
Figure 4 shows the mean femininity ratings of African American and Caucasian raters for the five different face types. Although the figure shows that Caucasian raters gave somewhat lower femininity ratings to the photos, the main effect of rater group was not significant, F(1,40) = 1.95, n.s. There was a main effect of photo, F(4,160) = 7.91, p< .01, but the interaction of race by photo type was not significant, F(4,160) = 0.875. The tendency in both rater groups was to rate the 100% African American and 100% Caucasian faces as more feminine, as compared to their ratings of faces with mixed features. Interestingly, the mean femininity ratings by African American raters were nearly identical for the 100% African American (3.63) and 100% Caucasian (3.76 faces, whereas the Caucasian raters clearly viewed the 100% Caucasian faces as more feminine (mean rating was 3.56, with a lower bound on the 95% confidence interval of 3.26, compared to their rating of 3.24 for the 100% African American faces).
Fig4 406
The morphed faces were considered symmetrical, according to Figure 5. According to the results of the 2 X 5 mixed ANOVA, African American judges rated the photos on symmetry in much the same fashion as did Caucasian judges; the main effect of race of judges was non-significant, F(1,38) = .221, n.s. The main effect of percentage ethnicity of the photographs was significant, F(4,152) = 3.79, p< .01, but the interaction with race of judge was not, F(4,152) = .791. As shown in Figure 5, and as confirmed by examining the 95% confidence intervals around the group means, faces at the 50% African American and 75% Caucasian levels were rated lower in symmetry than faces in the other conditions; means in those two groups were outside the 95% confidence limits of the other conditions’ means.
Fig5 407
As is apparent in Figure 6, ratings of youthfulness were nearly the same for African American and Caucasian raters, according to the results of the 2 X 5 mixed ANOVA; the main effect of race of rater was non-significant, F(1,38) = .03, n.s. The ratings of the five different faces did differ significantly, however, F(4,152) = 5.44, p< .01. Examination of the means and 95% confidence intervals revealed that mean ratings for the 75% AA and 50% AA faces were nearly the same, but fell out of the range of the means for the 75% CA and 100% CA means. The ratings for the 100% AA photos were intermediate, and not distinguishable from either of these two groupings. Apparently, both groups of raters found composite faces that appeared more Caucasian as more youthful, the intermediate levels of African American composites to appear less youthful, and found 100% African American faces to appear at an intermediate level of youthfulness.
Fig6 408
As seen in Figure 7, the African American men provided higher befriend ratings for the 100%, 75%, and 50% African American composites, in comparison to the Caucasian respondents (e.g., African American males’ AA 75% M = 3.28; Caucasian males AA 75% M = 2.86). The first two means were on the borderline of the 95% confidence interval of the contrasting mean. For example, for the 100% African American face, the mean of 3.10 for Black raters was barely in the 95% confidence interval of 2.15 to 3.11 for the White mean; for the 75% African American face, the mean of 3.28 for Black raters was just outside of the 95% confidence interval of 2.40 to 3.26 for the White mean. However different, the raters’ judgments of friendship interest were for the 100% African American and the mixed faces, African and Caucasian American men had almost equal interest in befriending the 100% Caucasian photos (African American males’ M = 3.05; Caucasian males’ M = 3.06).
Fig7 410

DISCUSSION
''The overall general societal rule with attraction has been that individuals were not to judge another person based on their physical appearance. Although these beliefs were regulated as being socially acceptable and politically correct, research has indicated that involuntarily, with assurance, and in complete opposition to standard beliefs, appearance based judgments occur; and these judgments directly affect the attractiveness, social desirability, and character trait ideals of an individual (Cunningham et al., 1995; Fink & Penton-Voak, 2002; Grammer & Thornhill, 1994; Jones, 1995; Langlois & Roggman, 1990; Langlois et al., 1994; Rhodes & Tremewan, 1996; Wade 2000; Wade, 2003; Valentine et al., 2004).''

sounds like the blackpill in retrospect:feelzez:

The results of the current study demonstrated some interesting findings in regard to ethnicity and facial preference for a number of measures. Moreover, several findings had strong theoretical merit and descriptive value . Interestingly, some aspects of the research supported the theories proposed in past studies. Conversely, this was not the case for each of the hypotheses presented in the current research.

For hypothesis one, it was predicted that African American men would find the 75% African American face as the most attractive because, according to the averageness theory, a prototype for an attractive face is established via exposure to thousands of faces over one’s lifespan. The current researcher speculated that African American men had been dually exposed to African American and Caucasian women and therefore established a prototype which included both ethnicities . It was further postulated that the 75% African American face would have been chosen versus the 50% or majority Caucasian faces due to Black male’s obligation to African American women and/or social acceptance/correctness . The researcher considered that the 75% majority African 61 American face would best meet the conditions of the averageness and social acceptance theories because a) the face included the majority culture which in turn sufficed the men’s exposure to White faces and b) the 75% morphs facial appearance was closely related to that of African American women so the choice would not be a complete rejection of Black female attractiveness. However, the hypothesis was marginally supported. Specifically, the African American participants rated the 100% and 75% African American faces the exact same. Further, they showed minimal differences toward the 50% African American/Caucasian face and the 100% Caucasian face. As reported in the results there was significant difference between the ratings of the 100% and 75% African American faces and the 75% Caucasian face (low scores for the 75% Caucasian face were constant across measures and ethnic groups). Although it was postulated that African American men would score the photos differently depending on their ethnic composition, the Black males’ opinions were more consistent with the averageness literature/theories than the current researcher originally proposed. This provides additional cross cultural evidence that the Black males’ evaluations’ support the theory, although the participant pool and the stimuli were both unique to the facial averageness Alternatively, the investigation indicated that there was an intragroup facial preference with the Caucasian American respondents. Although this finding was 62 a bit surprising in comparison to the majority of previous facial averaging outcomes, the results supported the cognitive facial averaging application and the ethnocentric/ingroup/outgroup literature

yet another ''study'' conforms that black women have the lowest sexual market value.:feelzez:

 

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Substitute Subhuman

Substitute Subhuman

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Tl;Dr make some cliff notes
 
IncelGolem

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100% bullshiiiiiiiiiiit. We know how colorism is in every ethnic community and we know much blacks like "light skin" black females ("redbone") and white females. This study is actually saying that african americans find 100% african faces the most attractive. Does anyone believe that?

They literally took people from the Black studies association, NAACP, and other pro-black organizations and showed them the same faces computer-manipulated to be different shades/racial features. And asked for their opinions. Of fucking course people will mask their non-PC sexual racial preferences. Even completely 100% anonymous on reddit, people tip-toe around the fact that they don't find certain racial features sexually attractive.

The researcher, Rhea Watson, is a black woman who either (A) has an agenda or (B) more likely, is too stupid to design a scientifically valid experiment.
 
Substitute Subhuman

Substitute Subhuman

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100% bullshiiiiiiiiiiit. We know how colorism is in every ethnic community and we know much blacks like "light skin" black females ("redbone") and white females. This study is actually saying that african americans find 100% african faces the most attractive. Does anyone believe that?

They literally took people from the Black studies association, NAACP, and other pro-black organizations and showed them the same faces computer-manipulated to be different shades/racial features. And asked for their opinions. Of fucking course people will mask their non-PC sexual racial preferences. Even completely 100% anonymous on reddit, people tip-toe around the fact that they don't find certain racial features sexually attractive.

The researcher, Rhea Watson, is a black woman who either (A) has an agenda or (B) more likely, is too stupid to design a scientifically valid experiment.
This! I cannot believe (outside of trying to prove a political point) that they really think the African faces are the most attractive.
 
Misogynist Curry 卐

Misogynist Curry 卐

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I don't find non caucasian faces attractive especially abo, niggers and dravidians they are the worst.
 
D

depressedblackcel

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Well I do find black women most attractive. For me it’s like black>mixed race (black/asian)> Latina> Mixed (black/white)> white> asian> Native American> Polynesian> south Asians> Abos
 
D

depressedblackcel

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100% bullshiiiiiiiiiiit. We know how colorism is in every ethnic community and we know much blacks like "light skin" black females ("redbone") and white females. This study is actually saying that african americans find 100% african faces the most attractive. Does anyone believe that?

They literally took people from the Black studies association, NAACP, and other pro-black organizations and showed them the same faces computer-manipulated to be different shades/racial features. And asked for their opinions. Of fucking course people will mask their non-PC sexual racial preferences. Even completely 100% anonymous on reddit, people tip-toe around the fact that they don't find certain racial features sexually attractive.

The researcher, Rhea Watson, is a black woman who either (A) has an agenda or (B) more likely, is too stupid to design a scientifically valid experiment.
I find black people attractive easily
 
Copexodius Maximus

Copexodius Maximus

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I don't find non caucasian faces attractive especially abo, niggers and dravidians they are the worst.
Dravidian = skinny abo

Well I do find black women most attractive. For me it’s like black>mixed race (black/asian)> Latina> Mixed (black/white)> white> asian> Native American> Polynesian> south Asians> Abos
Over for curries like usual
 
Linesnap99

Linesnap99

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at this point any colour hole would do for me.
 

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