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JFL It’s Over for Autistcels: You need to follow a 2000+ word guide to learn the same social skills that normies are born with!

Zer0/∞

Zer0/∞

I have no friends ;(
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How To Learn Social Skills With Asperger’s Syndrome​

I wrote this blog post to share the most important rule I learned for learning social skills with Asperger's syndrome. I've addressed this post to readers who have Asperger's themselves, but these tips can just as easily be used to help a loved one who has Asperger's.
The most important rule I've discovered is this: Learn social skills by understanding the reasons behind social situations, not through rote memorization.

The Problem With Rote Memorization​

The most natural way that people with Asperger's learn social skills is through rote memorization. We learn a specific response that works for a specific situation, and so when that situation occurs, we deploy that response.
For instance, we learn through trial and error that if someone tells us their name, we should tell them our name in return or they will be upset. Easy enough.
But if the situation changes, our memorized response doesn't help us. Let's say Bob introduces Joe to us. Do we tell Joe our name, or is that Bob's job? We memorized what to do in one specific situation, but when the situation changes we are out of luck.
Of course, rote memorization is better than nothing. But there's a better way.

Learning To Understand​

Instead of memorizing specific responses to specific situations, learn to understand the reasons behind a social situation. Train yourself to think through what other people expect from a situation, and ponder how you can help meet the expectations of others and make the interaction more positive.
When you learn to think through the reasons behind a social situation, you can use that knowledge to derive the correct response to the situation--even if you have no rote response memorized. All you need to do is ponder your understanding of what people expect from a situation, and then respond in a way that matches their expectations.
For instance, let’s dig deeper into introductions. What positive results do people expect from an introduction?
The obvious result is that an introduction allows people to share the data of what everyone's names are, but there's more than that. Some other desired results of an introduction might be:
  • The sharing of relevant information about the people being introduced (for instance "Hi, I'm Dan, and I'm a friend of Bob’s)
  • Giving everyone the chance to speak so they feel included.
  • Creating a socially acceptable way to start a conversation from scratch
  • Allows people to get a feel for each other before the conversation begins in earnest.
When we know the results that people expect from an introduction, we can use this knowledge to guide our actions.
For instance, if we see that one desired result of an introduction is to give everyone the chance to speak, we know that we shouldn't start telling a long story until everyone has been introduced.
If we see that introductions create a socially acceptable way to start a conversation, we know that if someone introduces themselves to us, they are trying to start a conversation and we should respond appropriately.
This concept applies to all situation situations, not just introductions. When we learn the desired results that people expect from a social situation, we can choose responses that help achieve the desired results for that situation. All you need to do is take a moment to think through the reasons behind a situation, and you can deduce what you should be doing in that situation.
By learning to understand the reasons behind a situation, we can free ourselves from the massive list of rote responses, and have a much greater ability to handle whatever social situation we find ourselves in. It really is that simple, and it really is that powerful.

Practical Applications​

I'll close with a few pieces of advice for how to apply this rule to your own lives.
First, please realize that you will not be able to create a comprehensive list of every desired result that people expect from an interaction, especially at first. But you should be able to think up at least a few, and you can ask friends and family to help you uncover more. You will also naturally discover more desired results of a given social situation simply by observing people in that social situation. So as time goes by, your understanding of social situations will grow more and more.
Second, if you are still having trouble understanding this idea, there is a metaphor that might help. Picture a classroom. The desired result of the classroom is for students to learn. A teacher has two options for trying to achieve this result. He can either make a lengthy list of rules--no talking in class, no chewing gum, raise your hand if you have a question, etc. Or, he can teach the students to think "If I do this action, will it disrupt the other students from learning?"
The lengthy list of rules is similar to the rote memorization. The problem with it is that it's impossible to make a rule that forbids every negative thing a student might do, and it's also no fun for students to have to memorize a huge list. The better option is for students to understand that their goal is to be non-disruptive, so they can think for themselves, and realize when a potential action would disrupt the classroom.
Third, if you need another example of understanding the reasons behind an interaction, take a look at my guide on how to make conversation. I explain the reasons behind conversation, and show you how you can use those reasons to guide your responses.
Finally, remember that like everything, this is a skill that grows with practice. If you learn to understand the reasons, you will not magically become a social superstar. It will take time, practice, and hard work for you to learn social skills in this way.
But it will take considerably more time, practice and hard work if you learn through rote memorization, and you will have much less success overall. When you learn to understand the reasons behind social situations and train yourself to react accordingly, you will dramatically multiply the benefit you receive from studying social skills. And as you continue to study social skills and grow in your understanding of social situations, you will find yourself increasingly able to thrive in social situations and build the deep, intimate relationships that you deserve.
This technique won't get you instant results. But if you start today, you'll be astonished by the changes you see over time. Good luck!
 
Ritalincel

Ritalincel

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Misogynist Curry 卐

Misogynist Curry 卐

I am 5'5 :(
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No social skills can help you when you're only 5'5:feelsrope::feelsrope:
 
Copexodius Maximus

Copexodius Maximus

Mentally destroyed by reality
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:lul::lul::lul::lul::blackpill::blackpill::blackpill:
Cope used by ugly people to say it was autism rather than 0 socialization from no one wanting to talk to them because they are ugly.
 
RuudVanNistelrooy

RuudVanNistelrooy

i'm far from the star
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No social skills for your face.
 
turbosperg

turbosperg

PTSD ADD NW4 5'9 4/10 sperg
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How To Learn Social Skills With Asperger’s Syndrome
Spergs' problems can't be a mere lack of "social skills". The fact of the matter is that foids have less empathy and social skills than a sperg.

The actual problem is that normies are disgusted by spergs. The sight of a sperg elicits in normies feelings of disgust similar to looking at maggots.

There was an experiment where NTs and spergs would read the same text from a script. The video was cut into a 5 second segment and shown to normies, who would make a negative valuation of the sperg. The same happened with audio-only, and even with a still photo.

This phenomenon above CANNOT BE EXPLAINED BY THE "SOCIAL SKILLS" meme.

I often say that normies give me social issues, not autism.

The problems autists face in their social life are because normies instinctively dislike autists.

That's why autism barely affects foids.
 
Last edited:
Pikacel

Pikacel

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I cba. I’m just going to make peace with my monotone voice and awkwardness. Putting in effort always backfires
 
bigantennaemay1

bigantennaemay1

Autistic social drifter without purpose or home
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Spergs' problems can't be a mere lack of "social skills". The fact of the matter is that foids have less empathy and social skills than a sperg.

The actual problem is that normies are disgusted by spergs. The sight of a sperg elicits in normies feelings of disgust similar to looking at maggots.

There was an experiment where NTs and spergs would read the same text from a script. The video was cut into a 5 second segment and shown to normies, who would make a negative valuation of the sperg. The same happened with audio-only, and even with a still photo.

This phenomenon above CANNOT BE EXPLAINED BY THE "SOCIAL SKILLS" meme.

I often say that normies give me social issues, not autism.

The problems autists face in their social life are because normies instinctively dislike autists.

That's why autism barely affects foids.
This is true. Studies have found that people can correctly identify that a person has a mental illness, at least on an instinctual level, even if they don't consciously know what is going on. As a result, we get judged negatively for being different from the very moment that people set eyes upon us. They can tell something is wrong, and don't want to associate with us out of fear of social consequence.
 
I.N.C.E.L.S. Boss

I.N.C.E.L.S. Boss

Kept you waitin, huh
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This is true. Studies have found that people can correctly identify that a person has a mental illness, at least on an instinctual level, even if they don't consciously know what is going on. As a result, we get judged negatively for being different from the very moment that people set eyes upon us. They can tell something is wrong, and don't want to associate with us out of fear of social consequence.
since they can't read you, they are afraid you can go :lasereyes: all of a sudden
 
latincell

latincell

Captain
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How To Learn Social Skills With Asperger’s Syndrome​

I wrote this blog post to share the most important rule I learned for learning social skills with Asperger's syndrome. I've addressed this post to readers who have Asperger's themselves, but these tips can just as easily be used to help a loved one who has Asperger's.
The most important rule I've discovered is this: Learn social skills by understanding the reasons behind social situations, not through rote memorization.

The Problem With Rote Memorization​

The most natural way that people with Asperger's learn social skills is through rote memorization. We learn a specific response that works for a specific situation, and so when that situation occurs, we deploy that response.
For instance, we learn through trial and error that if someone tells us their name, we should tell them our name in return or they will be upset. Easy enough.
But if the situation changes, our memorized response doesn't help us. Let's say Bob introduces Joe to us. Do we tell Joe our name, or is that Bob's job? We memorized what to do in one specific situation, but when the situation changes we are out of luck.
Of course, rote memorization is better than nothing. But there's a better way.

Learning To Understand​

Instead of memorizing specific responses to specific situations, learn to understand the reasons behind a social situation. Train yourself to think through what other people expect from a situation, and ponder how you can help meet the expectations of others and make the interaction more positive.
When you learn to think through the reasons behind a social situation, you can use that knowledge to derive the correct response to the situation--even if you have no rote response memorized. All you need to do is ponder your understanding of what people expect from a situation, and then respond in a way that matches their expectations.
For instance, let’s dig deeper into introductions. What positive results do people expect from an introduction?
The obvious result is that an introduction allows people to share the data of what everyone's names are, but there's more than that. Some other desired results of an introduction might be:
  • The sharing of relevant information about the people being introduced (for instance "Hi, I'm Dan, and I'm a friend of Bob’s)
  • Giving everyone the chance to speak so they feel included.
  • Creating a socially acceptable way to start a conversation from scratch
  • Allows people to get a feel for each other before the conversation begins in earnest.
When we know the results that people expect from an introduction, we can use this knowledge to guide our actions.
For instance, if we see that one desired result of an introduction is to give everyone the chance to speak, we know that we shouldn't start telling a long story until everyone has been introduced.
If we see that introductions create a socially acceptable way to start a conversation, we know that if someone introduces themselves to us, they are trying to start a conversation and we should respond appropriately.
This concept applies to all situation situations, not just introductions. When we learn the desired results that people expect from a social situation, we can choose responses that help achieve the desired results for that situation. All you need to do is take a moment to think through the reasons behind a situation, and you can deduce what you should be doing in that situation.
By learning to understand the reasons behind a situation, we can free ourselves from the massive list of rote responses, and have a much greater ability to handle whatever social situation we find ourselves in. It really is that simple, and it really is that powerful.

Practical Applications​

I'll close with a few pieces of advice for how to apply this rule to your own lives.
First, please realize that you will not be able to create a comprehensive list of every desired result that people expect from an interaction, especially at first. But you should be able to think up at least a few, and you can ask friends and family to help you uncover more. You will also naturally discover more desired results of a given social situation simply by observing people in that social situation. So as time goes by, your understanding of social situations will grow more and more.
Second, if you are still having trouble understanding this idea, there is a metaphor that might help. Picture a classroom. The desired result of the classroom is for students to learn. A teacher has two options for trying to achieve this result. He can either make a lengthy list of rules--no talking in class, no chewing gum, raise your hand if you have a question, etc. Or, he can teach the students to think "If I do this action, will it disrupt the other students from learning?"
The lengthy list of rules is similar to the rote memorization. The problem with it is that it's impossible to make a rule that forbids every negative thing a student might do, and it's also no fun for students to have to memorize a huge list. The better option is for students to understand that their goal is to be non-disruptive, so they can think for themselves, and realize when a potential action would disrupt the classroom.
Third, if you need another example of understanding the reasons behind an interaction, take a look at my guide on how to make conversation. I explain the reasons behind conversation, and show you how you can use those reasons to guide your responses.
Finally, remember that like everything, this is a skill that grows with practice. If you learn to understand the reasons, you will not magically become a social superstar. It will take time, practice, and hard work for you to learn social skills in this way.
But it will take considerably more time, practice and hard work if you learn through rote memorization, and you will have much less success overall. When you learn to understand the reasons behind social situations and train yourself to react accordingly, you will dramatically multiply the benefit you receive from studying social skills. And as you continue to study social skills and grow in your understanding of social situations, you will find yourself increasingly able to thrive in social situations and build the deep, intimate relationships that you deserve.
This technique won't get you instant results. But if you start today, you'll be astonished by the changes you see over time. Good luck!
Ain’t reading all that shit :feelswhat::feelswhat::feelswhat:. Just do like my normalfag friend and get drunk/high. You’ll be NT in no time :feelskek::feelskek::feelskek:
 
bigantennaemay1

bigantennaemay1

Autistic social drifter without purpose or home
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since they can't read you, they are afraid you can go :lasereyes: all of a sudden
I mean, that makes us even, since I can't read them, either, and don't know if they're about to go off. This led to many times as a kid growing up that my bullies would get the drop on me before I even realized what was going on.
 
I.N.C.E.L.S. Boss

I.N.C.E.L.S. Boss

Kept you waitin, huh
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I mean, that makes us even, since I can't read them, either, and don't know if they're about to go off. This led to many times as a kid growing up that my bullies would get the drop on me before I even realized what was going on.
yeah, can't read people either or they are so treacherous their acting fools me.
 
bigantennaemay1

bigantennaemay1

Autistic social drifter without purpose or home
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Zhou Chang-Xing

Zhou Chang-Xing

Mythic
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Spergs' problems can't be a mere lack of "social skills". The fact of the matter is that foids have less empathy and social skills than a sperg.

The actual problem is that normies are disgusted by spergs. The sight of a sperg elicits in normies feelings of disgust similar to looking at maggots.

There was an experiment where NTs and spergs would read the same text from a script. The video was cut into a 5 second segment and shown to normies, who would make a negative valuation of the sperg. The same happened with audio-only, and even with a still photo.

This phenomenon above CANNOT BE EXPLAINED BY THE "SOCIAL SKILLS" meme.

I often say that normies give me social issues, not autism.

The problems autists face in their social life are because normies instinctively dislike autists.

That's why autism barely affects foids.

Yep, Autism is a looks issue, we look different and sound different from normal people. They are disgusted by the fact that Autistic men exist. This is also why the NTpill is so brutal.

We didn't lack socialisation because our brains aren't capable of learning social cues and social dynamics, we lack socialisation because we were denied from being socialised and always excluded from socialising from birth.

In the Netherlands all Autistic children are dumped in special lower schools specifically to become NEET's. They go out of their way to isolate Autistic children from neurotypical children so they will never see an Autist growing up.

If it was important for Autistic children to socialise they would expose them to Neurotypical children as much as possible but they do the opposite. Special schools for Autistic boys don't exist to benefit the Autistic boys, they exist so NT kids don't have to interact with us. :blackpill::blackpill::blackpill:
 

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