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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: Organized Self-Deception and the antithesis of the Blackpill

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Bazinga

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So I don't often post here but I've been thinking about this for a while. Today I'm going to redpill you on what Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is.

What is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy?​

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is the most popular therapy technique today. It's stated goals are to allow patients to identify "distortions in their thinking" and better understand reality. Here's a link to an information guide from the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) I'll be referencing during this post.

https://camh.ca/-/media/files/guides-and-publications/cbt-guide-en.pdf

In reality, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to allow you to do the following, in order:
  1. Recognize negative perceptions you have about yourself and reality
  2. Dismiss these perceptions as false by using premade refutations
  3. Believe that you can control your circumstances
  4. Eventually change your "core beliefs" so that you no longer think your circumstances are bad
Note that "truth" enters nowhere into the equation. The guide I've linked above makes many mentions about "rationality" and how certain thoughts are illogical. These are lies. The fundamental belief about Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is that you, the patient, need to recognize that if you perceive reality negatively, you are irrational. It does not matter whether your perception of reality is true or false. The fact that it is making you sad means that you are insane.

The problem with this, of course, is that most people are not able to bend their perception of reality to make "2+2=5", so to speak, solely because believing that 2+2=5 makes them feel good. So Cognitive Behavioural Therapy works by removing your ability to think for yourself. It does this by convincing you that the negative thoughts you are having about yourself are "automatic"; i.e. not within your control. It then categorizes many common types of thoughts and provides ways to refute them.

Peter the Incel​

Let's go back to the CAMH guide and get an example. Chapter 3 mentions Peter, an incel. I'll copy and paste the dialogue here for people who don't want to click on the PDF.

Therapist: Can you think of a situation in the past week when you felt upset?
Peter: I was sitting on the subway and noticing all of the couples together.
Therapist: And what feelings came up for you as you were noticing the couples?
Peter: I was feeling sad and angry.
Therapist: And what were you thinking about as you were feeling sad and angry?
Peter: I was thinking everyone seems to have someone in their life but me, and it’s just not fair.
Therapist: And if it’s true that everyone seems to have someone but you, do you think this says something about you?
Peter: Yah, that I’m a loser and will always be alone.
Therapist: And what did you do when you were thinking and feeling this way?
Peter: After a while I couldn’t take it anymore so I got off the subway even though I hadn’t reached my stop yet. I went home and just sat on my bed thinking about all of this.
Peter is sad. He recognizes that most people are in happy relationships. Peter himself is not in a relationship. He is sad and angry because of this, as Peter values being in a relationship. Peter is having a normal reaction to not being able to fulfill his goals in life. He feels as if he will never be in a relationship. Let's analyze what the guide says are questions a therapist might ask.
“Do you know anyone that you like and respect who is not currently in a relationship?”
“Do you have any past experiences in romantic relationships?”
“If you had a good friend that had the same thoughts about himself or herself, what would you say to that friend?”
“Are you possibly discounting any life experiences to suggest that you will not be completely alone?”
“Are you potentially blaming yourself for something that you do not have complete control of?”
Note what isn't said. Question 1, for example, says that Peter should look at other people who aren't currently in a relationship. This is designed to make Peter feel as if his condition is temporary, or that it might change. Sure, you might not currently be in a relationship, but maybe you'll find someone to be with in the future!

Let's analyze Questions 2 and 4. They look logical, Peter should look at all of the evidence, right? But look at what isn't said. The therapist isn't asking Peter to look at all of his past, nor is the therapist asking Peter to examine any of the evidence that supports his current belief that he will always be alone. The therapist is just asking Peter to look at events in his life that go against his beliefs. This is called "cherry-picking" as a logical fallacy, and involves only looking at the evidence that supports a particular view. Peter should only think about the one time he held hands with a girl when he was 10 years old. Peter should not think about the hundreds of times he's been rejected in his life. He should look at his "girlfriend" he had for 3 months in middle school, not the 12 years he spent alone.

Question 3 is simpler, Peter should try to comfort himself and not feel sad like he might comfort a friend that was feeling sad. Nobody is going to tell their friend "it's over give up".

Question 5 is nebulously worded. On the surface, it looks like the therapist is trying to tell Peter that he might not have control over his inability to be in a relationship, In actuality, it assumes that Peter has partial control over his situation, and tries to make Peter feel as if the situation is "not his fault", or that he didn't choose to be an incel. This lays the foundation for the next step of cognitive behavioural therapy, where Peter will discover that his lack of choice to be in a relationship means that he really chose not to be in a relationship.

What all of these questions have in common is that they are designed to change Peter's beliefs, by making Peter himself recognize that his thinking is wrong. Peter's thinking is being replaced here by the therapist's, with carefully controlled questions designed to make Peter think what is necessary. Read this doublethink quote from CAMH that agrees.
"The goal here is not to challenge Peter’s thinking but rather to move him to a questioning mode and to consider the accuracy of his automatic thoughts based on evidence from his life."
Peter's beliefs aren't being challenged here, Peter is just being made to "question" them. This is illogical, "questioning" and "challenging" a belief are the same thing to the point that "Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief" was a question on the US common application for universities last year. [1] But this misses that the goal here isn't for the therapist to challenge Peter's beliefs, but for Peter to automatically recognize his wrongthink and correct it.

Identifying and correcting cognitive distortions​

This leads us into step number 2 of the four step guide I wrote above. Peter the Incel isn't going to be with his therapist 24/7. He won't always have someone to think for him. So to help prevent wrongthink, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy relies on identifying common depressing thoughts and trains you to remove them.

For instance, "Overgeneralization", which in reality refers to any attempt to generalize your experiences and extrapolate future events. Let's say you installed Tinder and got 0 matches. The women on Tinder obviously thought you weren't attractive, so you might be tempted to say that it's possible that women in general will find you unattractive. This is when Cognitive Behavioural Therapy steps in, and you come up with a justification that "Tinder isn't real life! Real life isn't a meat market! I should try Bumble/etc instead." (notice how many normies say this? I wonder why).

Or "Black-or-white thinking", which refers to any attempt to categorize your experiences into a binary. e.g., being a failure for not having sex, as opposed to being successful for having sex. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to step in there, and tell you that there are plenty of different experiences and there's no such thing as being "successful" or "failing". The reason why this is so powerful is because "binary oppositions" are what all human thought are structured on (t. Saussure [2]). By ignoring binaries and pretending they don't exist, your thoughts will lose all meaning and no longer make sense. By eliminating the concepts of "success" and "failure" you will not feel like a failure.

By creating catchy names and complex systems, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy allows you to identify and destroy rational thinking. After the ability to recognize wrongthink is firmly ingrained in your head, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy will teach you to...

Believe that you have control​

Once the ability to wrongthink has been removed from your head, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to make you have a feeling of control. At this point, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy starts to implement "rightthink" so to speak. For instance, in the CAMH document, Nancy wanted to drive up to her cottage, but was scared of having a panic attack. So she creates a table that lists the situation she's in, the "automatic thoughts" (i.e. wrongthink) she had about the situation, and the emotions she was having. This allows her to target those and feel like she's in control.

This is no accident and it's why Cognitive Behavioural Therapy stresses the importance of worksheets and homework. It structures your thoughts (homework is often called the "thought record") to align with how therapists want you to think and more importantly lets you feel like you're in control. You'll see this in a lot of the advice given from normies to incels, like "go to the gym" or "work on your personality". The goal here is to make you feel like you're in control of your inability to have sex, regardless of if you actually are in control or not. if you don't believe me, here's a direct quote from the document:
The cbt therapist can then help you to question and evaluate these assumptions and beliefs and to generate less distressing, alternative viewpoints as they occur in upsetting situations.
Structure your thoughts and soon you can generate "alternative viewpoints" for yourself!

Changing your core beliefs​

The ultimate goal of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy though, is to change something that's called your "core beliefs". This means refiguring your value system to prevent yourself from becoming depressed ever again. Let's say one of your life goals is fulfilling sexual relationships. The ultimate goal of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is to remove that as one of your goals. That's why "reformed incels" say that sex really isn't that important anyways. They've reached that stage, and no longer want sex because CBT has convinced them not to. Of course, this is tough. That's why the ability of choice is so heavily emphasized. It is far easier to say you don't value sex if you're choosing not to have it, than to say you don't value sex when you can't have it.

Once this core assumption is gone, the wrongthink that stems from it disappears. A core tenent of cognitive behavioural therapy is that your core beliefs spawn these negative thoughts, and once they are changed, wrongthink disappears as well. After all, if you no longer want sex, why would you be upset about being incel?
 
RecessedChinCel

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Didn’t read all but high IQ post will read later :feelshmm::feelshmm::feelshmm::feelshmm:
 
KingChemist

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LOL I remember my school sending me to CAMH a while back. It was exactly for this lol. I was supposed to take a CBT course.
 
the virgin shepherd

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So basically the antithesis of Freuds Free-Association but for self-proposed intellectuals.

I plan ony writing an aesthetical piace titled Free-Dissociation which dwells on this Idea but embraces a more holistic conceptualization.
 
extremegamer

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what's wrong with changing your core belief of needing fulfilling sexual relationships. i've done it. i still need it but not nearly as bad.
 
Cristo

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I see. A truecel in a r9k thread yesterday was talking about something like this.
How other people’s opinions cannot have the ability to interfere with his inner state, protected by a huge ego based on his status. Even as an old virgin NEET.
Basically convincing himself that if it makes him feel good it may as well be real.
Logical self-imposed deception is extremely cucked.:blackpill::feelsthink:
 
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Deleted member 36467

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KingChemist said:
LOL I remember my school sending me to CAMH a while back.
I was sent to CAMHS and believed their bullshit platitudes. All therapists can do is to gaslight you into conformity.
 
KingChemist

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Boba said:
I was sent to CAMHS and believed their bullshit platitudes. All therapists can do is to gaslight you into conformity.

To be fair I felt a bit better after the session. Realizing that it's not my fault I can't force someone to be in a relationship with me helped.
 
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RecessedChinCel said:
Didn’t read all but high IQ post will read later :feelshmm::feelshmm::feelshmm::feelshmm:
 
E

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Good run down on CBT. My psychologist straight up told me it only works if you buy into it. He said that being able to pick apart the logical flaws in CBT makes it extremely difficult to treat someone so he gave up on it. It's certainly voluntary brainwashing. I think the point of therapy though isn't learning to accept your life so much but about figuring out ways to cope with it
 
calimero

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Atavistic Autist @Atavistic Autist
 
HeimatVertrieben

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Bazinga said:
So I don't often post here but I've been thinking about this for a while. Today I'm going to redpill you on what Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is.

What is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy?​

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is the most popular therapy technique today. It's stated goals are to allow patients to identify "distortions in their thinking" and better understand reality. Here's a link to an information guide from the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) I'll be referencing during this post.

https://camh.ca/-/media/files/guides-and-publications/cbt-guide-en.pdf

In reality, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to allow you to do the following, in order:
  1. Recognize negative perceptions you have about yourself and reality
  2. Dismiss these perceptions as false by using premade refutations
  3. Believe that you can control your circumstances
  4. Eventually change your "core beliefs" so that you no longer think your circumstances are bad
Note that "truth" enters nowhere into the equation. The guide I've linked above makes many mentions about "rationality" and how certain thoughts are illogical. These are lies. The fundamental belief about Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is that you, the patient, need to recognize that if you perceive reality negatively, you are irrational. It does not matter whether your perception of reality is true or false. The fact that it is making you sad means that you are insane.

The problem with this, of course, is that most people are not able to bend their perception of reality to make "2+2=5", so to speak, solely because believing that 2+2=5 makes them feel good. So Cognitive Behavioural Therapy works by removing your ability to think for yourself. It does this by convincing you that the negative thoughts you are having about yourself are "automatic"; i.e. not within your control. It then categorizes many common types of thoughts and provides ways to refute them.

Peter the Incel​

Let's go back to the CAMH guide and get an example. Chapter 3 mentions Peter, an incel. I'll copy and paste the dialogue here for people who don't want to click on the PDF.











Peter is sad. He recognizes that most people are in happy relationships. Peter himself is not in a relationship. He is sad and angry because of this, as Peter values being in a relationship. Peter is having a normal reaction to not being able to fulfill his goals in life. He feels as if he will never be in a relationship. Let's analyze what the guide says are questions a therapist might ask.





Note what isn't said. Question 1, for example, says that Peter should look at other people who aren't currently in a relationship. This is designed to make Peter feel as if his condition is temporary, or that it might change. Sure, you might not currently be in a relationship, but maybe you'll find someone to be with in the future!

Let's analyze Questions 2 and 4. They look logical, Peter should look at all of the evidence, right? But look at what isn't said. The therapist isn't asking Peter to look at all of his past, nor is the therapist asking Peter to examine any of the evidence that supports his current belief that he will always be alone. The therapist is just asking Peter to look at events in his life that go against his beliefs. This is called "cherry-picking" as a logical fallacy, and involves only looking at the evidence that supports a particular view. Peter should only think about the one time he held hands with a girl when he was 10 years old. Peter should not think about the hundreds of times he's been rejected in his life. He should look at his "girlfriend" he had for 3 months in middle school, not the 12 years he spent alone.

Question 3 is simpler, Peter should try to comfort himself and not feel sad like he might comfort a friend that was feeling sad. Nobody is going to tell their friend "it's over give up".

Question 5 is nebulously worded. On the surface, it looks like the therapist is trying to tell Peter that he might not have control over his inability to be in a relationship, In actuality, it assumes that Peter has partial control over his situation, and tries to make Peter feel as if the situation is "not his fault", or that he didn't choose to be an incel. This lays the foundation for the next step of cognitive behavioural therapy, where Peter will discover that his lack of choice to be in a relationship means that he really chose not to be in a relationship.

What all of these questions have in common is that they are designed to change Peter's beliefs, by making Peter himself recognize that his thinking is wrong. Peter's thinking is being replaced here by the therapist's, with carefully controlled questions designed to make Peter think what is necessary. Read this doublethink quote from CAMH that agrees.

Peter's beliefs aren't being challenged here, Peter is just being made to "question" them. This is illogical, "questioning" and "challenging" a belief are the same thing to the point that "Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief" was a question on the US common application for universities last year. [1] But this misses that the goal here isn't for the therapist to challenge Peter's beliefs, but for Peter to automatically recognize his wrongthink and correct it.

Identifying and correcting cognitive distortions​

This leads us into step number 2 of the four step guide I wrote above. Peter the Incel isn't going to be with his therapist 24/7. He won't always have someone to think for him. So to help prevent wrongthink, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy relies on identifying common depressing thoughts and trains you to remove them.

For instance, "Overgeneralization", which in reality refers to any attempt to generalize your experiences and extrapolate future events. Let's say you installed Tinder and got 0 matches. The women on Tinder obviously thought you weren't attractive, so you might be tempted to say that it's possible that women in general will find you unattractive. This is when Cognitive Behavioural Therapy steps in, and you come up with a justification that "Tinder isn't real life! Real life isn't a meat market! I should try Bumble/etc instead." (notice how many normies say this? I wonder why).

Or "Black-or-white thinking", which refers to any attempt to categorize your experiences into a binary. e.g., being a failure for not having sex, as opposed to being successful for having sex. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to step in there, and tell you that there are plenty of different experiences and there's no such thing as being "successful" or "failing". The reason why this is so powerful is because "binary oppositions" are what all human thought are structured on (t. Saussure [2]). By ignoring binaries and pretending they don't exist, your thoughts will lose all meaning and no longer make sense. By eliminating the concepts of "success" and "failure" you will not feel like a failure.

By creating catchy names and complex systems, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy allows you to identify and destroy rational thinking. After the ability to recognize wrongthink is firmly ingrained in your head, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy will teach you to...

Believe that you have control​

Once the ability to wrongthink has been removed from your head, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to make you have a feeling of control. At this point, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy starts to implement "rightthink" so to speak. For instance, in the CAMH document, Nancy wanted to drive up to her cottage, but was scared of having a panic attack. So she creates a table that lists the situation she's in, the "automatic thoughts" (i.e. wrongthink) she had about the situation, and the emotions she was having. This allows her to target those and feel like she's in control.

This is no accident and it's why Cognitive Behavioural Therapy stresses the importance of worksheets and homework. It structures your thoughts (homework is often called the "thought record") to align with how therapists want you to think and more importantly lets you feel like you're in control. You'll see this in a lot of the advice given from normies to incels, like "go to the gym" or "work on your personality". The goal here is to make you feel like you're in control of your inability to have sex, regardless of if you actually are in control or not. if you don't believe me, here's a direct quote from the document:

Structure your thoughts and soon you can generate "alternative viewpoints" for yourself!

Changing your core beliefs​

The ultimate goal of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy though, is to change something that's called your "core beliefs". This means refiguring your value system to prevent yourself from becoming depressed ever again. Let's say one of your life goals is fulfilling sexual relationships. The ultimate goal of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is to remove that as one of your goals. That's why "reformed incels" say that sex really isn't that important anyways. They've reached that stage, and no longer want sex because CBT has convinced them not to. Of course, this is tough. That's why the ability of choice is so heavily emphasized. It is far easier to say you don't value sex if you're choosing not to have it, than to say you don't value sex when you can't have it.

Once this core assumption is gone, the wrongthink that stems from it disappears. A core tenent of cognitive behavioural therapy is that your core beliefs spawn these negative thoughts, and once they are changed, wrongthink disappears as well. After all, if you no longer want sex, why would you be upset about being incel?
1. Cock & Ball Torture
 
B

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Fat Link @Fat Link AmIjustDreaming @AmIjustDreaming pin this shit. Everybody needs to see the scam that's CBT.
 
Atavistic Autist

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calimero said:
Atavistic Autist @Atavistic Autist
It's fitting that I should read this thread today because I just quit my longstanding CBT therapist after no longer being able to bear their dogmatic bullshit. Like just hours ago :feelsgah:

Unlike E @Ehwhatever's therapist, it's clear that mine would never stop scheduling new appointments until I told them to stop. Because therapy is primarily a money-making industry, and the therapist has student loans to pay.

But what makes CBT so extraordinary compared to other forms of therapy is how vapid and dull it is. One's rich, internal life, replete with varied emotions and thoughts, is crudely imposed upon by a mediocre liberal arts major who desires to replace your personality with their own (a composite of sterile textbooks that they've read and cookie-cutter soy bugman assumptions).

Even as an autistic person, I found the mechanistic nature of CBT to be stilted and uninspiring af. Not to mention unhelpful, given that autistic systemizers like me are already good at logic and rationality, and don't take kindly to hypocrites who pose as beacons of reason.
 
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E

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Atavistic Autist said:
It's fitting that I should read this thread today because I just quit my longstanding CBT therapist after no longer being able to bear their dogmatic bullshit. Like just hours ago :feelsgah:

Unlike E @Ehwhatever's therapist, it's clear that mine would never stop scheduling new appointments until I told them to stop. Because therapy is primarily a money-making industry, and the therapist has student loans to pay.

But what makes CBT so extraordinary compared to other forms of therapy is how vapid and dull it is. One's rich, internal life, replete with varied emotions and thoughts, is crudely imposed upon by a mediocre liberal arts major who desires to replace your personality with their own (a composite of sterile textbooks that they've read and cookie-cutter soy bugman assumptions).

Even as an autistic person, I found the mechanistic nature of CBT to be stilted and uninspiring af. Not to mention unhelpful, given that autistic systemizers like me are already good at logic and rationality, and don't take kindly to hypocrites who pose as beacons of reason.
Don't get me wrong. My therapist would gladly keep scheduling appointments as well until I got fed up and left. I was seeing help for problems beyond depression like trauma and anxiety. I agree a huge flaw with therapy is that it discounts the importance of emotional experience though.

In the worst case scenario your therapist will try to gaslight you into believing your emotional response to certain events is irrational or unwarranted which would be considered a form of emotional abuse if it wasn't coming from a mental health "professional".
 
Fat Link

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based_meme said:
Fat Link @Fat Link AmIjustDreaming @AmIjustDreaming pin this shit. Everybody needs to see the scam that's CBT.
Done!:feelsclown::feelsPop:
 
Just talk to her

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I've had some experience with CBT but I could never articulate succinctly why it just felt like a load of tosh to me until this thread. Good read and I'm glad I never invested more time into it than I did.
 
OwlGod

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I don't think it works at all, at worst you're just wasting your time. psychiatry is far more dangerous.
 
Mentally lost cel

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OwlGod said:
I don't think it works at all, at worst you're just wasting your time. psychiatry is far more dangerous.
It doesn’t,I know
OwlGod said:
psychiatry is far more dangerous.
Very very sick and making people sleep and get Bluepilled
It’s just gigacope Bluepill , which might backfire
 
OwlGod

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Ehwhatever said:
Good run down on CBT. My psychologist straight up told me it only works if you buy into it. He said that being able to pick apart the logical flaws in CBT makes it extremely difficult to treat someone so he gave up on it. It's certainly voluntary brainwashing. I think the point of therapy though isn't learning to accept your life so much but about figuring out ways to cope with it

I think it's impossible for CBT to work.
you just sit there, and starts dialoguing with someone who has no ties to you, zero emotional attachment to what she or he says, zero effects onto the person. altering or restructuring thoughts is impossible either way. thoughts are automatically spontaneously generated, and anyone who thinks it's easy to do that, really is a moron. if it was so easy, then OCD patients would barely exist.
,,successful" stories of therapy or psychological treatments are mostly of females, as they've a predisposition, they're there to gain further reinforcement, validation of all their momentarily anteriorly set feelings, further strengthening all the encircling paranoia around about themselves until their Ego ignates beyond proportions.
 
watcher

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Brutal. In order to feel OK you have to lie to yourself (aka cope) and psychologists are nothing but frauds that teach you to lie to yourself.


I hate reality
 
Lv99_BixNood

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I've had to take some CBT sessions because I have severe OCD, and in this case it actually helped me. I think that for mental illnesses such as OCD therapy is actually legit (because the intrusive thoughts you get from OCD are fundamentally irrational and have nothing to do with reality), but the problem is that people think CBT should be applied to every kind of negative thought now, regardless whether these thoughts are actually irrational or not. Like a lot of "depression" is just people living in objectively shitty circumstances (like inceldom) and their negative reactions to these situations are completely sound and logical. And attemting to apply CBT here is when the whole thing goes from therapy to brainwashing and self-delusion.
 
E

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OwlGod said:
I think it's impossible for CBT to work.
you just sit there, and starts dialoguing with someone who has no ties to you, zero emotional attachment to what she or he says, zero effects onto the person. altering or restructuring thoughts is impossible either way. thoughts are automatically spontaneously generated, and anyone who thinks it's easy to do that, really is a moron. if it was so easy, then OCD patients would barely exist.
,,successful" stories of therapy or psychological treatments are mostly of females, as they've a predisposition, they're there to gain further reinforcement, validation of all their momentarily anteriorly set feelings, further strengthening all the encircling paranoia around about themselves until their Ego ignates beyond proportions.
For what it's worth I understand what you mean by thoughts being automatically generated. There's scientific evidence to support that thoughts are created before we're even aware or able to act on them. It brings up the question of whether we really have free will. Still, I'm hoping that EMDR therapy will help. It's supposed to help reprogram your brain to help with trauma which I think a lot of people here have. It's probably a huge cope but I'll try anything to not feel like roping at this point
 
Atavistic Autist

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Ehwhatever said:
Don't get me wrong. My therapist would gladly keep scheduling appointments as well until I got fed up and left. I was seeing help for problems beyond depression like trauma and anxiety. I agree a huge flaw with therapy is that it discounts the importance of emotional experience though.

In the worst case scenario your therapist will try to gaslight you into believing your emotional response to certain events is irrational or unwarranted which would be considered a form of emotional abuse if it wasn't coming from a mental health "professional".
Ah, so the point is that mine would never do anything but CBT, because that's how he's remunerated by insurance.
 
cvury

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Cock n Ball Torture
 
FlyFace

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Bazinga said:
This is called "cherry-picking" as a logical fallacy, and involves only looking at the evidence that supports a particular view. Peter should only think about the one time he held hands with a girl when he was 10 years old. Peter should not think about the hundreds of times he's been rejected in his life. He should look at his "girlfriend" he had for 3 months in middle school, not the 12 years he spent alone.
An exception will never break the pattern of the rules.
cvury said:
Cock n Ball Torture
Bazinga said:
This lays the foundation for the next step of cognitive behavioural therapy, where Peter will discover that his lack of choice to be in a relationship means that he really chose not to be in a relationship.
Ridiculous.. social animals don't just one day choose not to be social. There has to be a stimulus event that changes that animals perception
Bazinga said:
It is far easier to say you don't value sex if you're choosing not to have it, than to say you don't value sex when you can't have it.
It's funny because I don't value Life because I can't have it. Funny how that works. Still not going to go mental and start killing for no reason. Smarter things to do.
 
SchrodingersDick

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Great post. Should be pinned forever for all newcels to read.

I’ve been saying the same albeit in different terms

“Just think better thoughts bro!”
“Just stop thinking those thoughts bro!
“Just change your worldview so your problems are no longer problems bro!”
“Suspend object permanence and just ignore the problems entirely bro!”
 
Kaisercel

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CBT can be useful in some cases, like for people with OCDs, i.e. with irrational obsessions and compulsions, but I don't see how it could help with the distress caused by real problems, like being incel
 
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Kaisercel said:
CBT can be useful in some cases, like for people with OCDs, i.e. with irrational obsessions and compulsions, but I don't see how it could help with the distress caused by real problems, like being incel
It does help with the distress that's the whole point of the post. You just deny the existence of your problems and that works to prevent you from feeling bad. You're not an incel, you're just someone who hasn't found the right person yet. You repeat this process as you become a cuckold and a joke to everyone around you. Why do you think inceltears users have no self awareness? Cognitive behavioral therapy.
 
unuser

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I have always known it's bullshit, but talking with a woman outside of family can be a bit refreshing, even if she's just bulshitting. Because of this I frequently leave the sessions feeling lighter (at least for the 10min travel back home).

I wouldn't pay for this, but my parents pay and it makes them feel better, so :feelscomfy:
 
Vrthraghna

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Another word I like to use for therapy is "liberal brainwashing"
 
cvh1991

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Bazinga said:
So I don't often post here but I've been thinking about this for a while. Today I'm going to redpill you on what Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is.

What is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy?​

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is the most popular therapy technique today. It's stated goals are to allow patients to identify "distortions in their thinking" and better understand reality. Here's a link to an information guide from the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) I'll be referencing during this post.

https://camh.ca/-/media/files/guides-and-publications/cbt-guide-en.pdf

In reality, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to allow you to do the following, in order:
  1. Recognize negative perceptions you have about yourself and reality
  2. Dismiss these perceptions as false by using premade refutations
  3. Believe that you can control your circumstances
  4. Eventually change your "core beliefs" so that you no longer think your circumstances are bad
Note that "truth" enters nowhere into the equation. The guide I've linked above makes many mentions about "rationality" and how certain thoughts are illogical. These are lies. The fundamental belief about Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is that you, the patient, need to recognize that if you perceive reality negatively, you are irrational. It does not matter whether your perception of reality is true or false. The fact that it is making you sad means that you are insane.

The problem with this, of course, is that most people are not able to bend their perception of reality to make "2+2=5", so to speak, solely because believing that 2+2=5 makes them feel good. So Cognitive Behavioural Therapy works by removing your ability to think for yourself. It does this by convincing you that the negative thoughts you are having about yourself are "automatic"; i.e. not within your control. It then categorizes many common types of thoughts and provides ways to refute them.

Peter the Incel​

Let's go back to the CAMH guide and get an example. Chapter 3 mentions Peter, an incel. I'll copy and paste the dialogue here for people who don't want to click on the PDF.











Peter is sad. He recognizes that most people are in happy relationships. Peter himself is not in a relationship. He is sad and angry because of this, as Peter values being in a relationship. Peter is having a normal reaction to not being able to fulfill his goals in life. He feels as if he will never be in a relationship. Let's analyze what the guide says are questions a therapist might ask.





Note what isn't said. Question 1, for example, says that Peter should look at other people who aren't currently in a relationship. This is designed to make Peter feel as if his condition is temporary, or that it might change. Sure, you might not currently be in a relationship, but maybe you'll find someone to be with in the future!

Let's analyze Questions 2 and 4. They look logical, Peter should look at all of the evidence, right? But look at what isn't said. The therapist isn't asking Peter to look at all of his past, nor is the therapist asking Peter to examine any of the evidence that supports his current belief that he will always be alone. The therapist is just asking Peter to look at events in his life that go against his beliefs. This is called "cherry-picking" as a logical fallacy, and involves only looking at the evidence that supports a particular view. Peter should only think about the one time he held hands with a girl when he was 10 years old. Peter should not think about the hundreds of times he's been rejected in his life. He should look at his "girlfriend" he had for 3 months in middle school, not the 12 years he spent alone.

Question 3 is simpler, Peter should try to comfort himself and not feel sad like he might comfort a friend that was feeling sad. Nobody is going to tell their friend "it's over give up".

Question 5 is nebulously worded. On the surface, it looks like the therapist is trying to tell Peter that he might not have control over his inability to be in a relationship, In actuality, it assumes that Peter has partial control over his situation, and tries to make Peter feel as if the situation is "not his fault", or that he didn't choose to be an incel. This lays the foundation for the next step of cognitive behavioural therapy, where Peter will discover that his lack of choice to be in a relationship means that he really chose not to be in a relationship.

What all of these questions have in common is that they are designed to change Peter's beliefs, by making Peter himself recognize that his thinking is wrong. Peter's thinking is being replaced here by the therapist's, with carefully controlled questions designed to make Peter think what is necessary. Read this doublethink quote from CAMH that agrees.

Peter's beliefs aren't being challenged here, Peter is just being made to "question" them. This is illogical, "questioning" and "challenging" a belief are the same thing to the point that "Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief" was a question on the US common application for universities last year. [1] But this misses that the goal here isn't for the therapist to challenge Peter's beliefs, but for Peter to automatically recognize his wrongthink and correct it.

Identifying and correcting cognitive distortions​

This leads us into step number 2 of the four step guide I wrote above. Peter the Incel isn't going to be with his therapist 24/7. He won't always have someone to think for him. So to help prevent wrongthink, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy relies on identifying common depressing thoughts and trains you to remove them.

For instance, "Overgeneralization", which in reality refers to any attempt to generalize your experiences and extrapolate future events. Let's say you installed Tinder and got 0 matches. The women on Tinder obviously thought you weren't attractive, so you might be tempted to say that it's possible that women in general will find you unattractive. This is when Cognitive Behavioural Therapy steps in, and you come up with a justification that "Tinder isn't real life! Real life isn't a meat market! I should try Bumble/etc instead." (notice how many normies say this? I wonder why).

Or "Black-or-white thinking", which refers to any attempt to categorize your experiences into a binary. e.g., being a failure for not having sex, as opposed to being successful for having sex. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to step in there, and tell you that there are plenty of different experiences and there's no such thing as being "successful" or "failing". The reason why this is so powerful is because "binary oppositions" are what all human thought are structured on (t. Saussure [2]). By ignoring binaries and pretending they don't exist, your thoughts will lose all meaning and no longer make sense. By eliminating the concepts of "success" and "failure" you will not feel like a failure.

By creating catchy names and complex systems, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy allows you to identify and destroy rational thinking. After the ability to recognize wrongthink is firmly ingrained in your head, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy will teach you to...

Believe that you have control​

Once the ability to wrongthink has been removed from your head, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is designed to make you have a feeling of control. At this point, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy starts to implement "rightthink" so to speak. For instance, in the CAMH document, Nancy wanted to drive up to her cottage, but was scared of having a panic attack. So she creates a table that lists the situation she's in, the "automatic thoughts" (i.e. wrongthink) she had about the situation, and the emotions she was having. This allows her to target those and feel like she's in control.

This is no accident and it's why Cognitive Behavioural Therapy stresses the importance of worksheets and homework. It structures your thoughts (homework is often called the "thought record") to align with how therapists want you to think and more importantly lets you feel like you're in control. You'll see this in a lot of the advice given from normies to incels, like "go to the gym" or "work on your personality". The goal here is to make you feel like you're in control of your inability to have sex, regardless of if you actually are in control or not. if you don't believe me, here's a direct quote from the document:

Structure your thoughts and soon you can generate "alternative viewpoints" for yourself!

Changing your core beliefs​

The ultimate goal of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy though, is to change something that's called your "core beliefs". This means refiguring your value system to prevent yourself from becoming depressed ever again. Let's say one of your life goals is fulfilling sexual relationships. The ultimate goal of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is to remove that as one of your goals. That's why "reformed incels" say that sex really isn't that important anyways. They've reached that stage, and no longer want sex because CBT has convinced them not to. Of course, this is tough. That's why the ability of choice is so heavily emphasized. It is far easier to say you don't value sex if you're choosing not to have it, than to say you don't value sex when you can't have it.

Once this core assumption is gone, the wrongthink that stems from it disappears. A core tenent of cognitive behavioural therapy is that your core beliefs spawn these negative thoughts, and once they are changed, wrongthink disappears as well. After all, if you no longer want sex, why would you be upset about being incel?
Frankly therapy is a waste of time, especially if you’re a man. Women have taken over social “science” and therapy and have bent the institutions to their bias.
 
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"Therapy" is really just organized and systematic gaslighting.
 
BrazilianLambda

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Ehwhatever said:
Good run down on CBT. My psychologist straight up told me it only works if you buy into it. He said that being able to pick apart the logical flaws in CBT makes it extremely difficult to treat someone so he gave up on it. It's certainly voluntary brainwashing. I think the point of therapy though isn't learning to accept your life so much but about figuring out ways to cope with it

Where did you find such a based psychologist, lol?
based_meme said:
Fat Link @Fat Link AmIjustDreaming @AmIjustDreaming pin this shit. Everybody needs to see the scam that's CBT.

Well, I wouldn't necessarily call it a scam because the main premise of CBT is that a patient may have a distorted view of reality. If that's the case, CBT can be effective. Of course, this doesn't apply to based incels like us because we know that our issues aren't imaginary.

OwlGod said:
you just sit there, and starts dialoguing with someone who has no ties to you, zero emotional attachment to what she or he says, zero

Akchually, you don't want a therapost that has ties/emotional attachments to you. That would be like getting a bluepilled advice from your parents. A therapist must be objective in every way. (well, at least in theory; most of them are still bluepilled cucks)
 
Last edited:
MaxZM98

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Question 3: I would definitely tell my incel friend It's over. If he's sub 5, it'd hurt him even more to keep trying in futility
 
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BrazilianLambda said:
Well, I wouldn't necessarily call it a scam because the main premise of CBT is that a patient may have a distorted view of reality. If that's the case, CBT can be effective. Of course, this doesn't apply to based incels like us because we know that our issues aren't imaginary.
The main premise of CBT isn't that a patient may have a distorted view of reality, it's that the patient does have a distorted view of reality. Any thought that makes you feel worse about yourself is automatically irrational and any thought that makes you feel better about yourself is automatically rational.

CBT is always effective because the truth isn't that you feel bad because you're an incel, you feel bad because you know that you're an incel.

By simply denying that you're unattractive, denying that you're unable to get a gf, and considering any thoughts you have about the subject as "wrongthink", you will no longer be depressed. The goal is to transform you into one of the cucks who say "I just haven't found the right person yet" or "I could get a gf if I wanted to but I choose not to" or "I really don't need a relationship" because it doesn't matter that none of that is true, by believing it, you won't be depressed anymore.

That's the reason why CBT's success rates are so high and why it's the best method of psychotherapy. It always works because it doesn't actually rely on fixing the patient's problems (which is usually really difficult/impossible). It relies on convincing the patient to deny that their problems actually exist or that if they do exist, that they're not actually problems that need solving.
 

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