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News How Gen Z took over incel slang

AsiaCel

AsiaCel

INCEL DEATH SQUAD ACCELERATIONIST
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Nov 24, 2017
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Proves we have good personality and can create funny lingos/memes.


In the late ’90s, before social media or robust online dating, one woman in Toronto created a website for lonely singles to find loving relationships — she called it “Alana’s Involuntary Celibacy Project.” But what started as a way for people to connect eventually became a community overrun by violent men who blame women for their absence of a sex life. From there, they migrated to 4chan, an anonymous bulletin board website famous for giving us some of our most foundational online concepts, such as rickrolling, dank memes and copypastas. In many ways, this colorful memetic mosaic has had an immensely positive impact on the internet. But there’s a dark side to the site as well — certain boards, like /r9k/, are known breeding grounds for incel discussion, and the source of the incel words being used today. These slang terms developed on 4chan precisely because of the site’s anonymity. Since users don’t have identifiable aliases, they signal their in-group status through performative fluency in shared slang. Memes and niche vocabulary become a form of cultural currency, fueling their proliferation.Incels (as they’re known) are infamous for sharing misogynistic attitudes and bitter hostility toward the romantically successful. Their ideology has even turned deadly: The 2014 Isla Vista and 2018 Toronto incel terrorist attacks killed a collective 17 people and injured another 29. Yet, somehow, incels’ hateful rhetoric has bizarrely become popularized via Gen Z slang. In certain circles, for instance, it’s common to hear the suffix “pilled” as a funny way to say “convinced into a lifestyle.” Instead of “I now love eating burritos,” for instance, one might say, “I’m so burritopilled.” “Pilled” as a suffix comes from a scene in 1999’s “The Matrix” where Neo (Keanu Reeves) had to choose between the red pill and the blue pill, but the modern sense is formed through analogy with “blackpilled,” an online slang term meaning “accepting incel ideology.” Similarly, the popular suffix “maxxing” for “maximizing” (e.g., “I’m burritomaxxing” instead of “I’m eating a lot of burritos”) is drawn from the incel idea of “looksmaxxing,” or “maximizing attractiveness” through surgical or cosmetic techniques. Then there’s the word “cucked” for “weakened” or “emasculated.” If the taqueria is out of burritos, you might be “tacocucked,” drawing on the incel idea of being sexually emasculated by more attractive “chads.” And, finally, we have the word “sigma” for “assertive male,” which comes from an incel’s desired position outside the social hierarchy. So how did we get here? How did these words travel from a fringe, misanthropic internet subculture to relatively widespread use?From there, those words filter out to more mainstream websites such as Reddit and eventually become popularized by viral memes and TikTok trends. Social media algorithms do the rest of the work by curating recommended content for viewers. Here’s how that can work: I like to watch videos on urban planning, and I recently got a TikTok complaining that “it’s so hard being a walkpilled cardiomaxxer in a carcel gascucked state like Arizona.” I found the video funny, I admit, and so I “liked” it — which ended up giving me more incel-themed meme videos. And I’m not alone: Many people encounter these words in similar contexts. The term “sigma,” for example, was introduced to millions of TikTok users through the viral “Rizzler” song, with lyrics containing popular slang such as “I just wanna be your sigma.” Because these terms often spread in ironic contexts, people find them funny, engage with them and are eventually rewarded with more memes featuring incel vocabulary. Creators are not just aware of this process — they are directly incentivized to abet it. We know that using trending audio helps our videos perform better and that incorporating popular metadata with hashtags or captions will help us reach wider audiences. In the wake of the “Rizzler” song, for example, TikTok was awash with countless remixes, covers and memes referencing the song because creators knew those videos would perform well. As a result, the word “sigma” spread, becoming popular with Gen Alpha and younger Gen Z audiences. The same thing happened to some degree with other incel words. It’s easy to react to these developments with concern. By incorporating incel words into everyday slang, the reasoning goes, we could be normalizing a dangerous ideology and making it more accessible to people interested in the underlying concepts. But kids aren’t actually saying “cucked” because they’re “blackpilled”; they’re using it for the same reason all kids use slang: It helps them bond as a group. And what are they bonding over? A shared mockery of incel ideas. These words capture an important piece of the Gen Z zeitgeist. We should therefore be aware of them, keeping in mind that they’re being used ironically. In fact, it’s a delightful twist of fate that the incels’ own words are now being wielded against them. If this upsets the adults, all the better: The younger generations get to build a language of their own, distinguished from the older norms, as they have always done throughout history.
 
Proves we have good personality and can create funny lingos/memes.


The internet has transformed how Gen Z communicates. Our language is built on memes and a collective sense of wry existentialism, with our humor often turning dark or potentially dangerous, as it has when borrowing from the online community of men called “involuntary celibates.”
Incels (as they’re known) are infamous for sharing misogynistic attitudes and bitter hostility toward the romantically successful. Their ideology has even turned deadly: The 2014 Isla Vista and 2018 Toronto incel terrorist attacks killed a collective 17 people and injured another 29. Yet, somehow, incels’ hateful rhetoric has bizarrely become popularized via Gen Z slang.

In certain circles, for instance, it’s common to hear the suffix “pilled” as a funny way to say “convinced into a lifestyle.” Instead of “I now love eating burritos,” for instance, one might say, “I’m so burritopilled.” “Pilled” as a suffix comes from a scene in 1999’s “The Matrix” where Neo (Keanu Reeves) had to choose between the red pill and the blue pill, but the modern sense is formed through analogy with “blackpilled,” an online slang term meaning “accepting incel ideology.” Similarly, the popular suffix “maxxing” for “maximizing” (e.g., “I’m burritomaxxing” instead of “I’m eating a lot of burritos”) is drawn from the incel idea of “looksmaxxing,” or “maximizing attractiveness” through surgical or cosmetic techniques.

Then there’s the word “cucked” for “weakened” or “emasculated.” If the taqueria is out of burritos, you might be “tacocucked,” drawing on the incel idea of being sexually emasculated by more attractive “chads.” And, finally, we have the word “sigma” for “assertive male,” which comes from an incel’s desired position outside the social hierarchy.

So how did we get here? How did these words travel from a fringe, misanthropic internet subculture to relatively widespread use?

In the late ’90s, before social media or robust online dating, one woman in Toronto created a website for lonely singles to find loving relationships — she called it “Alana’s Involuntary Celibacy Project.” But what started as a way for people to connect eventually became a community overrun by violent men who blame women for their absence of a sex life. From there, they migrated to 4chan, an anonymous bulletin board website famous for giving us some of our most foundational online concepts, such as rickrolling, dank memes and copypastas. In many ways, this colorful memetic mosaic has had an immensely positive impact on the internet. But there’s a dark side to the site as well — certain boards, like /r9k/, are known breeding grounds for incel discussion, and the source of the incel words being used today.

These slang terms developed on 4chan precisely because of the site’s anonymity. Since users don’t have identifiable aliases, they signal their in-group status through performative fluency in shared slang. Memes and niche vocabulary become a form of cultural currency, fueling their proliferation.

From there, those words filter out to more mainstream websites such as Reddit and eventually become popularized by viral memes and TikTok trends. Social media algorithms do the rest of the work by curating recommended content for viewers.

Here’s how that can work: I like to watch videos on urban planning, and I recently got a TikTok complaining that “it’s so hard being a walkpilled cardiomaxxer in a carcel gascucked state like Arizona.” I found the video funny, I admit, and so I “liked” it — which ended up giving me more incel-themed meme videos. And I’m not alone: Many people encounter these words in similar contexts. The term “sigma,” for example, was introduced to millions of TikTok users through the viral “Rizzler” song, with lyrics containing popular slang such as “I just wanna be your sigma.” Because these terms often spread in ironic contexts, people find them funny, engage with them and are eventually rewarded with more memes featuring incel vocabulary.

Creators are not just aware of this process — they are directly incentivized to abet it. We know that using trending audio helps our videos perform better and that incorporating popular metadata with hashtags or captions will help us reach wider audiences. In the wake of the “Rizzler” song, for example, TikTok was awash with countless remixes, covers and memes referencing the song because creators knew those videos would perform well. As a result, the word “sigma” spread, becoming popular with Gen Alpha and younger Gen Z audiences. The same thing happened to some degree with other incel words.

It’s easy to react to these developments with concern. By incorporating incel words into everyday slang, the reasoning goes, we could be normalizing a dangerous ideology and making it more accessible to people interested in the underlying concepts. But kids aren’t actually saying “cucked” because they’re “blackpilled”; they’re using it for the same reason all kids use slang: It helps them bond as a group. And what are they bonding over? A shared mockery of incel ideas.

These words capture an important piece of the Gen Z zeitgeist. We should therefore be aware of them, keeping in mind that they’re being used ironically. In fact, it’s a delightful twist of fate that the incels’ own words are now being wielded against them. If this upsets the adults, all the better: The younger generations get to build a language of their own, distinguished from the older norms, as they have always done throughout history.

Jesus, paragraphs bro!

Fixed it for you.
 
I genuinely hope the faggot who caused the whole tik-tok invasion gets hit by a car, pissed on, defecated on, suffers burn scars from a fire, and then eventually dies so I can pour gasoline on his grave & role-up a nice big blunt of his packwatch.
 
1.Sigma is not an incel word
2.Calling people cucked was never exclusive to incels
3.Incels have been shitposting about there own terms years way before tik tok zoomers were doing it.

This reporter is literally retarded.
 
1.Sigma is not an incel word
2.Calling people cucked was never exclusive to incels
3.Incels have been shitposting about there own terms years way before tik tok zoomers were doing it.

This reporter is literally retarded.
Whatever....it's free fame.
 
Please use paragraphs
 
Normies are misusing and stealing our terms and lingos for thier personal attention, by doing it they are mocking the suffering of trucels
 
1.Sigma is not an incel word
2.Calling people cucked was never exclusive to incels
3.Incels have been shitposting about there own terms years way before tik tok zoomers were doing it.

This reporter is literally retarded.
 
I hate normie zoomers
 
In the past nerds were bullied, and now people voluntarily identify as nerds. The same is happening to the term incel. Its the new punk.
 
From there, they migrated to 4chan, an anonymous bulletin board website famous for giving us some of our most foundational online concepts, such as rickrolling, dank memes and copypastas. In many ways, this colorful memetic mosaic has had an immensely positive impact on the internet.

Did this boomer nigger really just simp for 4chan? We will probably be a colourful memetic mosaic to his "newspaper" in ten years.
 
I wanted to punch the screen while reading this
 
They are still spreading that 'le woman created the word incel' jewish bullshit propaganda jfl
 
Also gen z is the most incel group as foids become more and more hypergamous
 
terms like "toilets", "foids" should go mainstream too. that’d be hilarious
 
Repugnant how these shuttle-witted peasants prevaricate and blabber.
 
They are still spreading that 'le woman created the word incel' jewish bullshit propaganda jfl
Doesn't matter. It's like the humans came from Africa theory; doesn't make niggers good
 
Digest please. I don't want to read soy ramblings and vapid retelling of a history we already know.

terms like "toilets", "foids" should go mainstream too. that’d be hilarious
Those can't be culturally appropriated safely unlike how Chad was appropriated to mean virtuous man.
 
Digest please. I don't want to read soy ramblings and vapid retelling of a history we already know.


Those can't be culturally appropriated safely unlike how Chad was appropriated to mean virtuous man.
Yeah, unfortunately
 
1702386365388
 
gen Zs are the epitome of culture vultures. horrendous mish mash of internet culture, black hood speak, brit slang etc etc
 
Gen a will make it go global.
 
say on skibidi
 
JFL low tier globalhomo propaganda

Also why no concern over the nig speak?
 

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